Outside Events and Job Opportunities

Check out events on UCLA AISC's Upcoming Events page.

"Seaweed, Salmon and Manzanita Cider" at the Los Altos History Museum

The exhibit explores traditional California Indian food sources, their sophisticated system
of environmental knowledge and the importance of native foods in contemporary
California Indian communities.

Los Altos History Museum welcomes Seaweed, Salmon and Manzanita Cider: A California Indian Feast Exhibition


Through April 16, 2017
Los Altos, CA – Filled with historic and contemporary photographs, baskets and other artifacts, food specimens, memoirs, and recipes, Seaweed, Salmon, and Manzanita Cider: A California Indian Feast is a traveling exhibition from the Grace Hudson Museum and Exhibit Envoy. The exhibit, which opens at the Los Altos History Museum on January 12, 2017 and runs through April 16, 2017 features foods important in the lives of Native Californians including fish, shellfish, seaweed, meat, vegetables, berries, fruits, flowers, nuts, seeds, and salt.  This delicious look at Native foods is based on the Heyday Books publication Seaweed, Salmon, and Manzanita Cider: A California Indian Feast by Margaret Dubin and Sara-Larus Tolley (2008), a delightful and sometimes startling compendium of Native American cuisine (the most authentic local food around).

Sherrie Smith-Ferri, Director of the Grace Hudson Museum in Ukiah (www.gracehudsonmuseum.org), curated this exhibition in consultation with her aunt, Kathleen Rose Smith, a California Indian artist and a member of the Coast Miwok and Dry Creek Pomo tribes. Smith-Ferri notes how much fun it was to put the exhibit together. "It brought back lots of good memories of getting together with the family to spend time at the coast harvesting abalone, mussels and seaweed, or going to pick berries. And of course, it brings back recollections of some great meals eaten together. I found I would get really hungry if I worked too long a stretch of time on the exhibit."

"Our foods were (and still are) as varied as the landscape, as are our methods of preparing them," states Kathleen Rose Smith. "We ate them raw. We roasted, boiled, baked, leached, steeped, dried, and stored them, and, after contact, we fried, and canned them."

The book and the exhibit contain harvesting instructions and recipes for many delicious foods, including Huckleberry Bread, Pine Nut Soup, Rose Hip or Elderberry Syrup, Peppernut Balls, and Ingeniously Roasted Barnacles.

Modern California Indians have retained much of the precious plant and animal knowledge of their ancestors, and are in a process of recovering even more. "Despite missionization, Mexican land grants, the Russian quest for sea otters, and American expansionism, we are still here," states Smith. "We knew (and still know) the land with an intimacy that results from countless interactions."

Program:
February 11, 10-12 pm at the Los Altos History Museum, free
Native Plants as Food
An introduction to safe plant foods gathered by Native Americans along the west coast. Learn about the uses and tastes of many local plants, grind acorns, and play a native stick game.

Exhibition Support: Funding for this exhibit was provided by the Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians, the Mendocino County Office of Education, Exhibit Envoy, and the Sun House Guild.

The Museum is open Thursday through Sunday, from noon-4pm.  Admission is free. The gardens, outdoor agricultural exhibits and picnic area are accessible beyond Museum hours. For more information, go to www.losaltoshistory.org, email hello@losaltoshistory.org, or phone 650.948.9427 x14.

Fellowship Opportunities at the John Carter Brown Library, 2016-2017

The John Carter Brown Library (JCB), an independently funded institution for advanced research on the campus of Brown University, will award approximately forty residential fellowships for the year July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017. The Library contains one of the world’s premier collections of primary materials related to the discovery, exploration, and settlement of the New World to 1825, including books, maps, newspapers, and other printed objects. JCB Fellowships are open to scholars and writers working on all aspects of the Americas in the early modern period.

Short-term Fellowships are for two to four months with a monthly stipend of $2,100. Open to US and foreign citizens who are engaged in pre- or post-doctoral or independent research. Graduate students must have passed their preliminary or general examinations at the time of application.

Long-Term Fellowships are for five to ten months with a monthly stipend of $4,200. These include two to four NEH Fellowships, for which an applicant must be a US citizen or have lived in the US for the three years preceding the application deadline, and other long-term JCB awards for which all nationalities are eligible. Graduate students are not eligible for long-term JCB Fellowships.

Recipients of all fellowships must relocate to Providence and be in continuous residence at the JCB for the full term of the award. Rooms are available for rent at Fiering House, the JCB’s Fellows’ residence, a beautifully restored 1869 house just four blocks from the Library.

The deadline for short- and long-term fellowships is December 1, 2015.

For more information - including information about Thematic and Cluster Fellowships - and application instructions, visit www.jcbl.org or e-mail jcb-fellowships@brown.edu.

Udall Foundation: Internship and Scholarship Program Opportunities

The Udall Foundation is pleased to announce our 2015 internship and scholarship program opportunities for American Indian and Alaska Native students. We request your assistance in identifying students who would be excellent candidates for our programs and encouraging them to apply.

The Native American Congressional Internship<http://udall.gov/OurPrograms/Internship/AboutInternship.aspx> program is a fully-funded, ten-week summer internship in Washington, DC, for American Indian and Alaska Native undergraduate, graduate and law students. Interns work in congressional and agency offices where they have opportunities to research legislative issues important to tribal communities, network with public officials and experience an insider’s view of the federal government. The Foundation provides airfare, housing, per diem, and a $1,200 educational stipend. The application deadline is January 31, 2015<http://udall.gov/OurPrograms/Internship/ImportantDates.aspx>.  For an application and information about complimentary webinars, please see our “Apply<http://udall.gov/OurPrograms/Internship/Apply.aspx>” page.

The Udall Scholarship<http://udall.gov/OurPrograms/Scholarship/AboutScholarship.aspx> program awards $5,000 merit-based scholarships for college sophomores and juniors seeking a career in tribal health, tribal public policy, or the environment. Two- and four-year college students are encouraged to apply. Scholars participate in a five-day Orientation<http://udall.gov/OurPrograms/Scholarship/Orientation.aspx> in Tucson, AZ, to learn from and network with experts, their peers, and members of the Udall family. The award includes life-time membership in the Udall alumni community<http://udall.gov/OurPrograms/Scholarship/AlumniNetwork.aspx>, a vibrant community offering job and internship opportunities, support for public service initiatives, and intellectual discussion. Applications must be submitted through a Udall faculty representative<http://udall.gov/OurPrograms/Scholarship/HowToApply.aspx> at the student's college or university. The application deadline is March 4, 2015. A faculty representative directory and schedule of free webinars can be found on the “Apply<http://udall.gov/OurPrograms/Scholarship/Apply.aspx>” page.

The Udall Foundation honors Morris K. Udall’s thirty years of service in the U.S. House of Representatives and Stewart L. Udall’s service as Secretary of the Interior. Both men worked tirelessly for the rights of American Indian and Alaska Native peoples. Since 1996, 110 tribes have been represented in the scholarship and internship programs.

We encourage you to visit our website at www.udall.gov and join our Facebook group Native Education @ Udall Foundation<https://www.facebook.com/groups/NativeEducationUdallFoundation/>. There, you’ll find our alumni profiles, tips for the applications, and more. We are eager to hear from interested students, faculty, staff and educational partners directly by email or phone. Thank you for your time and assistance. We look forward to working with you!

Harpo Foundation Accepting Application for Native American Artists Fellowships

New online database showcases tribal governance resources

A new database on tribal governance is now available http://phys.org/news/2012-10-online-database-showcases-tribal-resources.html. "The Indigenous Governance Database, recently launched by the UA's Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management and Policy, pulls together in one central location articles, case studies, videos and other resources focused on governance, sovereignty, leadership, and sustainable economic and community development."

Resource for High School Students: Paying for College (Scholarship Booklet)

This is a contribution, to provide scholarship information for Native students, to encourage and promote postsecondary education for Native students, to promote networking opportunities for Native Americans, and to raise awareness and appreciation for the contributions made by Native Americans to our society. I share this resource with the hope that you would also seek compassion about young people who need guidance and support toward finding the quality of life. You may duplicate and distribute this free booklet. ~Rosie Dayzie, email: rosie.dayzie@gmail.com

Extramural Funding Opportunities for Entering Students

Many of the fellowships provide multiple years of funding and are for students in their first year or two of graduate studies. After that, they are no longer eligible to apply. Thus the sooner students learn about these opportunities, the better their chances of preparing a strong application.

Receptionist, United American Indian Involvement

Job Location:

Los Angeles

 

Reports to (title):

 Program Director

Department:

United American Indian Involvement

 

Supervises:

NA

Working title:

Receptionist

 

Classification:

Non-Exempt

Salary Range:

$10.50  -  $13.50 Hrly / DOE-DOQ

 

Status:

Regular

Hours/week:

40

 

Effective Date:

 

Type of Position:

Full-time / Part-time

 

Revised Date:

9/29/2016

 

POSITION PURPOSE AND SUMMARY

The receptionist serves as the initial point of contact for United American Indian Involvement (UAII).  The receptionist is responsible for greeting, receiving, and directing clients as well as business guests in person or telephone.  Will also serve as backup to Patient Registration Services.

essential Duties, functions & Responsibilities 

  • Welcomes clients, visitors and vendors entering the establishment, signs them in, determines their patient registration status, determines nature and  purpose of visit, and directs them to appropriate staff or specific destination
  • Maintains  confidentiality of the client sign-in sheet, documents, and all forms
  • Collects client identification and documentation and makes copies for patient registration.
  • Reviews voicemail messages left on the main line (weekends and after hours) and routes them to the appropriate staff.
  • Answers incoming phone calls and routes them to the appropriate staff.
  • Take messages and deliver to appropriate staff when needed.
  • Issues parking validations to clients and business guests when approved by staff.
  • Processes incoming and outgoing mail and courier needs for the organization.
  • Type emails, develop memos, make photocopies, send faxes, and file information.
  • Responsible for updating the community center with current brochures, flyers, and other information developed by the departments.
  • Contributes to a team effort by accomplishing related tasks and assignments as needed.
  • Will serve as backup to Patient Registration Services which includes interviewing the client to collect demographics, review forms/documents to determine basic eligibility to UAII services. Must communicate with case management and/or other departments who are next to assist the client. 

 

Project Coordinator, Robert Sundance Family Wellness Center

Job Location:

Los Angeles

 

Reports to (title):

Program Director

Department:

Robert Sundance Family Wellness Center

 

Supervises:

NA

Working title:

Project Coordinator

 

Classification:

Non-exempt

Salary Range:

DOE/DOQ

 

Status:

Regular

Hours/week:

40/week

 

Effective Date:

9/30/16

Type of Position:

Full-time

 

Revised Date:

9/12/16

 

POSITION PURPOSE AND SUMMARY

The Project Coordinator is responsible for coordinating day-to-day activities for RSFWC’s  Youth Prevention & Early Intervention grants. The Project Coordinator is part of a multi-disciplinary team that oversees programming to prevent substance use and suicidal behaviors among youth and young adults.

essential Duties, functions & Responsibilities 

  • Responsible for day-to-day aspects of the project
  • Participates in project planning and coordination of project activities
  • Participates in project conference calls and meetings
  • Recruit project participants and conduct community outreach activities
  • Facilitate informational workshops relevant to prevention and early intervention for substance use and suicidal behaviors
  • Provide depression screenings to youth and young adults and provide follow-up, as needed
  • Collaborate with project partners and consultants to plan, design and implement project activities
  • Must be able to travel, as required by funding sources
  • Participate in group supervision and program staff meetings.
  • Produce reports in a timely and accurate manner as required by funding sources and the Program Director.
  • Maintain documentation of all client encounters utilizing internal data management system (RPMS).
  • Responsible for communicating and collaborating with various community agencies
  • Adhere to agency policies and advance the goals of UAII in a manner that embodies the agency’s philosophy.
  • Attend all staff meetings and departmental and agency events as required by Program Director
  • Arrange work schedule to benefit the Center program and clients with the approval of Program Director
  • Keep Director well informed regarding activities, pending issues and potential problems
  • Other duties as assigned or required to fulfill the purpose of the position.

 

UCLA Assistant Director, Native American/Alaskan Native Recruitment

Requisition Number:

24108  

Job Title:

STUDENT AFFAIRS OFFICER 3 EXEMPT  

Working Title:

Assistant Director, Native American/Alaskan Native Recruitment  

Salary:

$4,159 - $8,217 monthly  

Job Type:

Career  

Department Name:

5120-UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION  

Department Website URL:

www.admission.ucla.edu  

Requisition #: 24108. Posting closes on July 5th https://hr.jobs.ucla.edu

In support of Undergraduate Admission (UA) efforts to meet annual new student recruitment and enrollment goals, the Assistant Director directs the development, planning, implementation and evaluation of new student recruitment and yield activities, and participates in application review. The primary objective of the position is to stimulate and motivate an academically competitive, talented and broadly diverse applicant pool of California resident, domestic non-resident and international students and assist these students through the admission and enrollment process. Visit secondary schools and community colleges in California, across the U.S. and internationally (as needed), providing substantive information about UCLA specifically, and the University of California generally (as required). Provide information on admissions requirements, processes and deadlines; financial aid; housing, and campus services.

The Assistant Director will be assigned a specific target population which is the American Indian population, the incumbent will be sufficiently well-versed to work with this targeted population, as well as a variety of prospective student audiences. Maintain a full schedule of school/college visits, making oral presentations and conducting workshops. Represent UA/UCLA in special joint programs with schools, colleges, and UC campuses. Advise prospective applicants and parents. Cultivate, establish and maintain working relations with counselors, administrators, other school personnel, tribal leaders and Native colleagues in the United States. Based on analysis, designs, implements and participates in activities to increase the yield of highly able and other target recruitment populations. Participate in application review providing information on targeted schools, and by reading applications, assessing applicant academic performance, and recommending admission using established guidelines. Manage one or more specific functions, such as Stay-Over Programs; Campus Tours, Alumni and Bruin Ambassador Programs, STOMP and annual UA staff training as well as specialized staff training programs. Hire, train and supervise student assistants to support program needs.

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Note: External links and announcements should not be considered an endorsement by UCLA or the American Indian Studies Center.