Past Events

2018

  • 8th Annual L.A. Skins Music Fest
    Saturday, August 4, 4 - 8 PM, Bandshell Sycamore Grove Park, 4702 N Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90042
    Annual music fest featuring Native music
    Co-sponsor by UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • American Indian Graduation Celebration
    Friday, June 15, 2018, 4 – 7 PM, Covel Commons, Grand Horizon Room
    End of the year celebration for the graduates (graduate, undergraduate, and professional) of the American Indian Studies at UCLA.
    Host: UCLA American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program
    Co-sponsor by UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • After the Genocide: Indigenous Struggles for Justice and the Impact of Court Trials in Guatemala
    Thursday, May 10, 2018, 1:30 - 3:45 pm, roundtable panel & reception, Rolfe 1301; 4-7 pm, film screening of 500 Years and Q&A, Haines 39
    Please join us on the fifth anniversary of Ríos Montt's genocide conviction to discuss these and other related questions with Dr. Marta Elena Casaus Arzú (Distinguished Professor at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid) and Dr. Irma Alicia Velásquez Nimatuj (outgoing Mellon Visiting Professor at Duke University). Dr. Casaus has published extensively on racism and discrimination against the Mayan peoples of Guatemala, while Dr. Velásquez Nimatuj has been at the forefront of struggles for the respect of indigenous cultures for decades. As well-known experts in the Guatemalan genocide, both our guest speakers participated as expert witnesses in the genocide trial against Efraín Ríos Montt (2013 and 2018) as well as in the “Sepur Zarco” trial for sexual violence and sexual slavery committed against Mayan women (2016).
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, Latin American Institute, and the Department of Spanish & Portuguese.
  • Skawennati and Jack Gray: I LAND 2018
    Thursday, May 10, 3 PM, GSE&IS Bldg, Room 111 & 4:30 PM, Kaufman Hall Room 200
    lease join us Thursday, May 10 at 3pm in Room 111 GSE&IS Building for a talk by Skawennati, Mohawk multimedia artist, Co-Director of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC) and Partnership Coordinator of The Initiative for Indigenous Futures. Her talk is titled My Life as an Avatar: Activation Remix. The colloquium will be followed by a performance activation and talk by Maori contemporary dance artist Jack Gray, organized by the Worlds Arts and Culture/Dance Department. This UCLA Regents' Lecture will take place at WAC, Gloria Kaufman Hall, Room 200 at 4:30pm.
    Co-sponsor by UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • The 33rd Annual UCLA Pow Wow
    Saturday-Sunday, May 5-6, 2018, all day, UCLA North Athletic Field
    The 33rd annual pow wow, organized and presented by the UCLA American Indian Student Association, featuring traditional Native American singing and dancing, the Miss UCLA Pow Wow Pageant.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Student Association
    Co-Sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Nahuatl Conference
    Friday, May 4, 2018, 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM, Charles E. Young Grand Salon, Kerckhoff Hall
    This conference is brought to you by an alliance of the Latin American Centers at UCLA, Stanford University, and the University of Utah to promote the study of Nahuatl, with the participation of the Instituto de Docencia e Investigación Etnólogica de Zacatecas (IDIEZ). Thirteen international scholars, including three native-language speakers of Nahuatl from Veracruz, will present their research on Nahuatl language and culture.
    Sponsors: Latin American Institute, Center for Mexican Studies, UCLA International Institute, Spanish and Portuguese, Department of History, Cesar E. Chavez Center for Interdisciplinary Instruction in Chicana and Chicano Studies, Chicano Studies Research Center, University of Utah Latin American Center, Stanford University Latin American Center, UCLA American Indian Studies Center, UCLA Nahuatl Club
  • Reflections on Prairie Rising: Indigenous Youth, Decolonization, and the Politics of Intervention Wednesday, April 25, 2018, 4:00 PM, UCLA Charles E. Young Research Library, Presentation Room
    Presented by Jaskiran Dhillon, Assistant professor of global studies and anthropology at The New School in New York City. This talk offers a unique opportunity to think through the arguments of Jaskiran Dhillon’s new book Prairie Rising: Indigenous Youth, Decolonization, and the Politics of Intervention (University of Toronto Press, 2017). Prairie Rising provides a series of critical reflections about the changing face of settler colonialism through an ethnographic investigation of Indigenous-state relations, with a careful and deliberate focus on the lives of Indigenous youth, in the city of Saskatoon, Canada. The book uncovers how various groups including state agents, youth workers, and community organizations utilize participatory politics in order to intervene in the lives of Indigenous youth living under conditions of colonial occupation and marginality. In doing so, Prairie Rising sheds light on the changing forms of settler governance and the interlocking systems of education, child welfare, and criminal justice that sustain it. Moreover, Dhillon’s analysis exposes how the push for inclusionary governance ultimately reinstates colonial settler authority and raises startling questions about the federal government’s commitment to justice and political empowerment for Indigenous Nations, particularly within the context of the everyday realities facing Indigenous youth. This discussion will also offer a space to deliberate critical questions about the production and circulation of knowledge with respect to Indigenous youth, and provide insights on the implications of this work for the fields of youth studies, Indigenous studies, anthropology, and social work as well as implications for direct action and political organizing.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center and UCLA American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program.
  • Book Talk: UC Davis historian Andrés Reséndez's The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America
    Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 4:00 PM, Bunche 6725
    Andrés Reséndez is the author of The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America, winner of the 2017 Bancroft Prize. It was also a finalist for the 2016 National Book Award and 2nd longlisted for the 2017 PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction. Reséndez grew up in Mexico City, where he received his BA in International Relations. He briefly went into politics and served as a consultant for historical soap operas (telenovelas). He received his Ph.D. in History at the University of Chicago and has taught at Yale, the University of Helsinki, and the University of California, Davis where he is a history professor and departmental vice chair. His other books include A Land So Strange: The Epic Journey of Cabeza de Vaca (Basic Books, 2007), and Changing National Identities at the Frontier: Texas and New Mexico, 1800-1850 (Cambridge University Press, 2005).
    Hosted by the UCLA Department of History. Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center.
  • Indian Given: Racial Geographies Across Mexico and the United States and Somewhere Else
    Thursday, April 12, 2018, 3 PM, UCLA Charles E. Young Research Library, Main Conference Room 11360
    Maria Josefina Saldaña Portillo is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at NYU and Visiting Professor of English at UC Berkeley. She is the author of The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development (Duke University Press, 2003). Indian Given was awarded the Best Book Award from the National Association for Chicano and Chicana Studies (NACCS) in 2017. Professor Saldaña's presentation addresses the imbrication of NAFTA, narcos, and the legacy of the indio bárbaro.
    Sponsored by the Department of Gender Studies.
    Co-Sponsored by The Center for the Study of Women, American Indian Studies Center, American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program, Department of English, The Latin American Institute, and The Chicano Research Center
  • From Garden Warriors to Good Seeds: Indigenous Food Sovereignty & Community Gardens
    Friday, April 6, 2018, 4–6 PM, UCLA La Kretz Garden Pavilion
    Join Dr. Elizabeth Hoover as she discusses her book project "From 'Garden Warriors' to 'Good Seeds;' Indigenizing the Local Food Movement". This work explores Native American farming and gardening projects around the country: the successes and challenges faced by these organizations, the ways in which participants define and envision concepts like food sovereignty, and the importance of heritage seeds. Dr. Hoover is the Manning Assistant Professor of American Studies at Brown University.
    Sponsored by: UCLA American Indian Studies Center, UCLA Laboratory for Environmental Narrative Strategies (LENS), UCLA Healthy Campus Initiative Food Studies Program, and UCLA Mildred E. Mathias Botanical Garden
  • Uncolonized — Film Screening and Talk
    Wednesday, April 4, 2018, 4–6 PM, Kaufman Hall Room 200
    Uncolonized is a short documentary film about a native family who decided never to enroll their two daughters into the public school system, choosing instead to homeschool them from birth. Chris is Potawatomi and Chasity is Navajo. Their daughters Nathaney and Mimicah, ages 11 and 7 at the time of filming, carry both of their parents' lineages in their blood, but also in their way of being.
    Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, UCLA American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program, and the UCLA World Arts and Culture/Dance.
  • Indexology, Human Ranking, and Pseudo-Science: A Critical Perspective from the Global South
    Tuesday, March 6, 2018, 12–2 PM, Rolfe 2125
    Guest lecture featuring Professor Steve Ratuva, Fulbright Senior Scholar. This lecture will explore the latent consequences of neoliberalism in the forms of compartmentalization, stratification, and commodification of knowledge.
  • Meet-and-Greet with Dr. Stephanie Gilbert
    Monday, March 5, 2018, 12:30 PM, 3232 Campbell Hall
    A special meet-and-greet with Dr. Stephanie Gilbert who joined UCLA on a PostDoctoral Fulbright Scholarship to research further her work in body, identity and inheritable trauma.
  • Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu at UCLA
    Thursday, February 22, 2018
    Public lecture, 11-12:15 PM, Haines Hall A18
    Community talk, "Moments and Epiphanies in the Life of a Māhū," 2-3:30 PM, UCLA Powell Library East Rotunda
    Hosted by the UCLA Department of Asian American Studies. Co-sponsored by the UCLA OID, Institute of American Cultures, American Indian Studies Center, and Asian American Studies Center.
  • A Special Performance by Mayan Hip Hop Artist Tzutu Bak'tum
    Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 12-1 PM, Dickson Court - North
    Maya hip hop artist Tzutu Bak'tum visited UCLA to share his original music from Guatemala.
  • Welcome Event for Dr. Nancy Marie Mithlo
    Wednesday, January 24, 2018, 3-5 PM, Charles E. Young Research Library
    IAC 2017-18 Visiting Researcher, Nancy Marie Mithlo, presented on her work on the 2017 Venice Biennale exhibit Wah shka, featuring the artists Marcella Ernest, Shan Goshorn and Keli Mashburn.
  • Oral History/Ethnography in Tribal Communities
    Tuesday, January 9, 2018, 2 – 4 PM, Rolfe Hall, Room 2125
    In this panel, UCLA Professors Jessica Cattelino, Paul Kroskrity, Greg Schachner, and Shannon Speed will discuss their work as oral historians and as ethnographers. The panel will cover best practices for conducting interviews and working with tribal communities.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies IDP

2017

  • Indigenous Autonomy and National Politics in Mexico
    Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 12 PM, Student Activities Center, B-Level, Conference Room 3
    Ángel Kú and Valiana Aguilar, two compañeras from the Center for Encounters and Intercultural Dialogues and the Universidad de la Tierra, Oaxaca will share information about Indigenous autonomy and community self-determination across Mexico but especially in Oaxaca, Chiapas, and Yucatán. They will also provide important updates about the current initiative of the El Congreso Nacional Indígena (CNI) and the Zapatistas, especially their effort to support the CNI's Concejo Indígena de Gobierno's spokesperson and her effort to enter the national election as an official candidate. Additionally, they will share information about the current autonomous efforts to rebuild communities impacted by the hurricane and earthquake in Oaxaca's Isthmus.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Multiple InJustices: Indigenous Women, Law, and Political Struggle in Latin America — An Intergenerational Dialogue
    Thursday, November 16, 2017, 4 PM, 6275 Bunche Hall
    Dr. R. Aída Hernández Castillo presents her book, "Multiple InJustices: Indigenous Women, Law, and Political Struggle in Latin America," along with a conversation with Dr. Shannon Speed and Brenda Nicolas.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Sundance Institute and UCLA American Indian Studies Center Present: Out of State (2017)
    Saturday, November 11, 2017 5:30 PM, The Autry in Griffith Park
    Marking the directorial debut of filmmaker Ciara Lacy (Native Hawaiian), this documentary tells the story of an incredible journey. Shipped thousands of miles away from the tropical islands of Hawai'i to a private prison in the Arizona desert, two Native Hawaiians discover their Indigenous traditions from a fellow inmate serving a life sentence. Afterward, as they struggle with the hurdles of life as formerly incarcerated men, they ask whether you can really go home again. Q&A with Lacy and light reception to follow.
    Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center and Sundance Institute
  • INDIVISIBLE and the Resistance
    Tuesday, November 7, 2017, 3:30 PM, Room 2355, Public Affairs
    A special event featuring speakers Billy Fleming and Zacharie Boisvert, in conversation with Melany De La Cruz-Viesca, Laure Murat, and Abel Valenzuela Jr., and moderated by Ananya Roy. INDIVISIBLE seeks to cultivate a progressive grassroots network of local groups organized across the United States to build political power, to resist the destructive political agendas of the Trump administration, to challenge structures of white supremacy, and to advocate and realize bold policies for social justice.
    Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • IAC Fall Forum and Reception
    Thursday, November 2, 2017 4 PM, James West Alumni Center
    Honoring the Visiting Scholars, Post-Doc, and Research Grant Awardees of 2017-18.
    Hosted by the UCLA Institute of American Cultures
    Sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, Asian American Studies Center, Bunche Center for African American Studies, and Chicano Studies Research Center
  • Tongva Language Research and Reclamation
    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 4 PM, Room 2232, Public Affairs Building
    Professor Emeritus Pam Munro, Department of Linguistics, will give a special lecture, with a guest speaker, Virginia Carmelo (Tongva educator).
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center and the UCLA American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program
  • City of Inmates-- Book Talk and Siging with Kelly Lytle Hernández
    Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 4 – 6 PM, UCLA Ackerman Student Union - Bruin Viewpoint Room
    City of Inmates: Conquest, Rebellion and the Rise of Human Caging in Los Angeles, 1771-1965 explains how the City of Angels became the capital city of the world’s leading incarcerator. Marshaling more than two centuries of evidence, historian and Bunche Center Interim Director Kelly Lytle Hernández unmasks how histories of native elimination, immigrant exclusion, and black disappearance drove the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles. Hernández documents the persistent historical bond between the racial fantasies of conquest, namely its settler colonial form, and the eliminatory capacities of incarceration. City of Inmates is also a chronicle of resilience and rebellion, documenting how targeted peoples and communities have always fought back. Those who fought the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles altered the course of history in the city, the borderlands, and beyond. It is a story that is far from over.
  • Promised Land Film Screening and Panel Discussion
    Friday, October 20, 2017, 6 PM, Dodd 147
    A special screening of the documentary, Promised Land, with a panel discussion.
  • "Right Wrongs" Online Exhibition & Reception
    Thursday, October 12, 2017, 4 PM, 6275 Bunche Hall
    "Right Wrongs" Online Exhibition with Craig Ritchie, CEO of Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, and followed by a reception co-hosted by the Australian Consulate.
    Hosted by the Australian Consulate and UCLA American Indian Studies Center.
  • Elena de Hoyos Hermanas en la Sombra
    Tuesday, October 10, 2017, 4:30 PM, Lydeen Library, 4302 Rolfe Hall
    Short film screening of Semillas de Guamuchil & Reading and Discussion of Poems and Texts by Rural and Indigenous Mexican Women in Reclusion.
    Hosted by the UCLA Department of Spanish & Portuguese, American Indian Studies Center
  • Indigenous Peoples Day Celebration
    Monday, October 9, 2017, 5 PM, The Elizabeth & W. Thomas Courtyard at the Fowler Museum at UCLA
    The elimination of Columbus Day and the establishment of Indigenous Peoples Day in its place on the second Monday of October represents a huge victory for indigenous people and for everyone in Los Angeles. Please join us for a gathering to honor the work of the city representatives and community coalition that made this historic victory possible.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center.
  • Weaving Generations Together: Evolving creativity in the Maya of Chiapas
    Thursday, October 5, 2017, 4–6:30 PM, UCLA Powell Library, Main and East Rotandas through December 15
    An opening reception for a textile exhibition, "Weaving Generations Together," curated by Patricia Greenfield, UCLA Department of Psychology, and Kathryn Klein, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.
    Co-sponsored by UCLA Library, American Indian Studies Center, Latin American Institute, Center for Mexican Studies, Center for the Study of Women, Chicano Studies Research Center, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, Fiat Lux, Office of Instructional Development
  • UCLA American Indian Welcome
    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 5-7 PM, UCLA Pauley Pavilion Clubhouse
    Students, alumni, community members, faculty, and staff are invited to the 2017 welcome celebration for the American Indian community at UCLA
  • Trump's Violent Reassertion of White Supremacy, the Threat of Genocide, and What Must Be Done, NOW!
    Thursday, September 7, 2017, 7 PM, 1102 Perloff Hall
    THE TRUMP/PENCE regime is consolidating a fascist program, unleashing Nazi stormtroopers, that will mean unimaginable horrors for humanity and, as part that, will bring down a reign of terror, on top of centuries of savage oppression of Black people. Carl Dix, drawing on the new synthesis of communism developed by Bob Avakian, will speak to how this regime was spawned by the system of capitalism/imperialism and why everybody must throw in to drive it out of office NOW, as part of getting ready for revolution!
  • 7th Annual L.A. Skins Music Fest
    Saturday, July 29, 2017, 5:30 PM, Spoke Bicycle Cafe
    The 7th Annual L.A. SKINS MUSIC FEST is a Native American concert series taking place at the SPOKE BICYCLE CAFE on the L.A. River. The music fest features rock, jazz, pop and blues. Los Angeles has the largest urban population of Native Americans in the United States, totaling 150,000, and has a vast talent pool of Indigenous musicians.
  • Teaching the Tongva - A Third Grade Workshop
    Tuesday-Wednesday, July 25-26, 2017, 9 - 3 PM, Kuruvungna Springs Cultural Center and Museum
    This 2-day workshop for 3rd grade teachers, co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, CSU Dominguez Hills History Project, and the UCLA History-Geography Project, will explore Los Angeles' indigenous history and indigenous present. Join us and Tongva educators for an interactive experience that will include content speakers, exploration of curriculum and cooking with native plants.
    Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, Mapping Indigenous Los Angeles, CSU Dominguez Hills History Project, and the UCLA History-Geography Project
  • American Indian Graduation Celebration
    Friday, June 16, 2017, 4 – 7 PM, Covel Grand Horizon
    End of the year celebration for the graduates (graduate, undergraduate, and professional) of the American Indian Studies at UCLA.
    Host: UCLA American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program, UCLA American Indian Student Association
  • American Indian Studies Research Symposium
    Tuesday, June 13, 2017, 9 - 4 PM, Room 2357, UCLA School of Law
    Join the Interdepartmental program as we celebrate the research of the graduating class of 2017 — Master Theses, Undergraduate Major Capstones and other student research/Internships. Lunch provided by the American Indian Studies Center.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies IDP, Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Policy Forum: The Governance of Indigenous Data
    Thursday-Friday, May 18-19, 2017, UCLA Public Affairs Building, Room 2355
    A one and a half working meeting hosted by Dr. Randall Akee, Assistant Professor of Public Policy.
    Sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • The 32nd Annual UCLA Pow Wow
    Saturday-Sunday, May 6-7, 2017, UCLA North Athletic Field
    The 32nd annual pow wow, organized and presented by the UCLA American Indian Student Association, featuring traditional Native American singing and dancing, the Miss UCLA Pow Wow Pageant.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Student Association
    Co-Sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • The Aqueduct Between Us
    Monday, April 24, 2017, 4:00 - 6:00 PM, Coral Tree Walk
    The Aqueduct Between Us” is a social justice water symposium that aims to serve two communities by exposing the people of Los Angeles, residents and students alike, to the perspective of Owens Valley tribal communities concerning water and tribal sovereignty. An all-tribal panel from the Owens Valley (Bishop, Big Pine, Lone Pine tribes) will present their history, before and after the LADWP constructed aqueduct, and the resulting injustices. This symposium aims to build a robust coalition between these tribal communities and Angelenos; to help pressure the LADWP to recognize tribal sovereignty.
    Panalists:
    Alan Bacock, Water Coordinator for the Big Pine Paiute Tribe, Big Pine Tribal member
    Kathy Bancroft, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Lone Pine Paiute-Shoshone Tribal member
    Monty Bengochia, Bishop Tribal Council Chairman, Bishop Paiute Tribal Member
    Ray Naylor Hunter, Administrative and Political Consultant, Lone Pine Paiute-Shoshone Tribal member
    Harry Williams, Environmental activist, educational guest speaker for White Mountain Research Station, Bishop Paiute Tribal member
    Moderator:
    Angela Mooney D'arcy, Sacred Places Institute for Indigenous Peoples, Acjachamen/Juaneno Tribal member
    Sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, American Indian Graduate Student Association, and Tribal Learning Community & Education Exchange
  • Standing with Mother Earth
    Friday, April 21, 2017, 5:00 - 7:00 PM, A18 Haines Hall
    SPEAKERS:
    Dennis Banks, Elder Co-Founder of the AIM
    Robby Romero, Native Rock Recording Artist
    MUSIC BY
    Robby Romero, Native Rock Recording Artist
    Raye Zaragoza, Singer-Songwriter
    HONOR SONG BY: Spirit Lake Singers
  • River Revere: Jimmy Durham's Enigmatic Serpent The Banks of the Ohio
    Tuesday, April 18, 2017, 3:00 - 5:00 PM, Bunche Hall, Room 6275
    Presented by Dr. Chadwick Allen, Associate Vice Provost for Faculty Advancement and Professor of English and American Indian Studies at the University of Washington. Author of the books Blood Narrative: Indigenous Identity in American Indian and Maori Literary and Activist Texts and Trans-Indigenous: Methodologies for Global Native Literary Studies, he is a past President of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) and the current Editor of the journal Studies in American Indian Literatures. During the 1992 Columbus Quincentenary, controversial Cherokee artist Jimmie Durham created a serpent-inspired installation titled The Banks of the Ohio, part of the will/power exhibit staged at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio.  The body of Durham’s serpent is assembled from green PVC pipes used in modern plumbing, while the serpent’s head is fashioned from mud.  Additional mud is smeared across the white walls of the gallery, creating swirling “tracks” of movement.  Critics have read Durham’s installation as a profane reference to the sacred Serpent Mound located in southwestern Ohio, asserting that Durham’s use of sewage pipes offers a critical commentary on US settler colonialism’s profane soiling of North American landscapes and histories. In this paper, Allen locates Durham’s serpent more firmly in its multiple (sacred and profane) Indigenous and colonial contexts and considers not only the serpent’s PVC body and the gallery’s sullied walls, but also the series of drawings and collages Durham created to accompany the installation. These pieces include schematics of the Wexner Center and excerpts from provocative historical texts, and they were pinned to the gallery’s walls to provide crucial context for interpretation. They help re-place and re-animate Durham’s enigmatic serpent within multiple structures of agency and meaning.
    Sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • First Peoples: A Celebration of Native Artists in Southern California
    April 4 - 22, 2017, Open Tuesday- Saturday 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM, San Fernando Valley Arts and Cultural Center | Gala Opening Reception- Saturday, April 8, 2017, 7:00 - 10:00 PM
    FIRST PEOPLES is a unique cultural exhibition showcasing the diverse artwork of 31 Southern California artists with indigenous roots North or South of the Border. Described as "interesting and important" by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, an exhibition co-sponsor, FIRST PEOPLES presents myriad answers to the question: What does it mean to be a Native artist? Photographs of Native Americans provocatively dressed as Hollywood icons.
    Contemporary baskets and pottery made traditionally. A poignant video interview with a Native grandmother. Paintings, watercolors, prints and mixed media art that interpret Native life, spirituality and identity.An elaborate buckskin dress made for a TV soap star by the family of fabled Comanche chief Quanah Parker.
    A "domestic installation" that comments on parallels between gang attire and native regalia.This is but a small sampling of the 109 varied artworks on display (many of which are available for purchase). The generational range of participating artists—from university students to tribal elders—is as diverse as their art practices. Personal Artist Statements and detailed descriptive labels contextualize the art and communicate a unified theme: Far from having "vanished," indigenous peoples flourish today and continue to be nourished by their Native cultures.The gala opening reception on Saturday, April 8, from 7 to 10 pm, will feature a blessing by Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians Tribal President Rudy J. Ortega, Jr., performances by Native youth, and light refreshments. The public is invited.
    Organized by Walter L. Meyer, a Los Angeles based independent curator with a special interest in cross-cultural projects, FIRST PEOPLES is being presented by the San Fernando Valley Arts & Cultural Center (SFVACC), a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.
    Co-sponsored by the San Fernando Valley Arts and Cultural Center and the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • [Job Talk] Cultural Sovereignty and the Future of Tribal Self-Determination
    Thursday, March 23, 2017, 4 - 6 PM, 6275 Bunche Hall
    Presented by Dr. Rebecca Tsosie, Regents' Professor of Law; Special Advisor to the Provost for Diversity and Inclusion, University of Arizona.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • A Conference on Race, Indigeneity, and Settler Colonialism
    Thursday, March 9, 1:30 - 5:30 PM; Friday, March 10, 9:30 - 5:30 PM, Room 1327, UCLA School of Law
    At a time of heightened awareness of the enduring challenges of race in America, this conference will highlight transnational insights on the historiography of race that have emerged from the study of settler colonialism.
    Sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Somos Piedras: Indigeneity, Feminicide, and Migration in Central American Art
    Wednesday, March 8, 3pm - 5pm, Founders' Room, UCLA James West Alumni Center
    Presented by Dr. Kency Cornejo, Assistant Professor, Modern/Contemporary Latin American Art, University of New Mexico.
    To date Central America holds among the highest feminicide rates in the world, exceeding those in Mexico and other Latin American countries. Simultaneously, the repression and murder of indigenous environmental leaders is on the rise. Meanwhile, a wave of migrant Central American women and unaccompanied children continue to head north in search of refuge. This lecture will analyze contemporary art of Central America to discuss the underlying structures that connect Indigenous genocide, gender-based violence, and forced displacement for Central Americans. Through performance, video art, and other artistic interventions, this lecture explores how artists expose the traumas of war, neoliberalism, displacement, and repression of the female and indigenous body while condemning nations' complacency, placing Central America in both an artistic and broader socio-political context.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center and the UCLA Latin American Institute
  • [Job Talk] Black Belonging, Indigenous Sovereignty: The Intersections of Blackness and Indigeneity in Post-Rebellion Detriot
    Thursday, March 2, 2017, 4pm - 6pm, Cornell Hall Room D307, UCLA Anderson School of Management
    Presented by Kyle T. Mays, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • [Job Talk] Against Possession Through Whiteness: Challenging Race and Settler Colonialism in Hawai'i
    Friday, February 24, 2017, 2pm - 4pm, Hacienda Room, UCLA Faculty Center
    Presented by Dr. Maile Arvin, Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies, UC Riverside
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • [Job Talk] The Indigenous Other: Native Photography's Desires and Discontents
    Wednesday, February 22, 2017, 4pm - 6pm, Sierra Room, UCLA Faculty Center
    Presented by Dr. Nancy Marie Mithlo, Associate Professor of Art History and Visual Arts, Occidental College and Chair, American Indian Studies, Autry Museum of the American West
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Damaging Minds and Bodies: Trauma, Violence, and the Criminal Justice System
    Friday, February 10, 10am - 4pm, Charles E. Young Research Library Conference Room and
    Saturday, February 11, 10am - 4pm, Dodd 147
    A two-day symposium addressing the destructive impact of the U.S. criminal justice system, including through policing, courts, jails, prisons, and immigration detention facilities, on the physical and mental health on racially and economically vulnerable communities, people with disabilities, and families. A central theme and purpose of the event involves confronting contemporary criminal justice practices as, essentially, a public health crisis. Some specific areas for dialogue and learning include the degenerative health effects of prison and detention conditions, collective trauma and terror within communities of color stemming from police violence, justice system treatment of sexually vulnerable and gender-nonconforming people, deaths of incarcerated people with mental illness, the invisibility of indigenous people in contemporary dialogue about policing and incarceration, racial profiling, detention and persecution of Muslim, Arab and Middle Eastern people, and the relationships between healthcare and social service disparities and vulnerability to arrest and incarceration.
    Sponsored by Repair and Cosoponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, the UCLA Law Youth and Justice Clinic, the UCLA Disabilities Center, NASW, and NetCE
  • Pursuing the PhD?: Process of the PhD Path, Application Tips, and Choosing a Program
    Wednesday, February 15, 2017, 2:00pm - 1:15pm, Public Affairs Building, Room 4357
    A panel about doctoral programs from three UCLA professors, Dr. David Shorter (World Arts and Cultures), Dr. Shannon Speed (Gender Studies, Anthropology), and Dr. Ananda Marin (Education). Recommended for Undergrad and Graduate Students.
    Sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Taking Control: A Hawaiian Chief, Indigenous Worlds, and the Fringes of Empires
    Thursday, February 2, 2017, 3-5 PM, Gold Hall Room B313, UCLA Anderson School of Management
    A special lecture presented by Professor David Chang, Department of History at the University of Minnesota.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center

2016

  • IAC Fall Forum and Reception
    Thursday, December 1, 2016, 4:30-7 PM, California Room, UCLA Faculty Center
    Honoring the Visiting Scholars, Post-Doc, and Research Grant Awardees of 2016-17.
    Hosted by the UCLA Institute of American Cultures
    Sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, Asian American Studies Center, Bunche Center for African American Studies, and Chicano Studies Research Center
  • 10th Annual LA SKINS Fest
    Friday, November 18, 2016, 8 PM, Barnsdall Gallery Art Theater
    Free Film Screening of FIRE SONG
    Co-sponsored by UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Standing Rock Teach-in
    Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 3:30-5:30 PM, Dickson Court North
    Join UCLA students, faculty, postdocs, and guests for #NoDAPL Day of Action by leading a teach-in on the Dakota Access Pipeline and resistance/water protection. Members of our UCLA community who have traveled to Standing Rock will share their knowledge and experiences.
    Hosted by UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Caravan Against Repression in Mexico
    Monday, November 14, 2016, 12-2 PM, 144 Haines Hall
    Representatives of diverse sectors of Mexican society fighting against state repression and the US militarization of Mexico will appear to educate students and the public about the their cause.
    The Caravan brings together 2 mothers of the 43 disappeared students of Ayotzinapa; a student from the Rural Normal School of Ayotzinapa, Guerrero; agricultural workers of San Quintín; a representative and relative of a political prisoner from Committee of Victims from Nochixtlán, Oaxaca; a member of the Otomí community from Xochicuautla; and a mother from Return Our Daughters Home of Ciudad Júarez.
    Co-sponsors: UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, and the Latin American Institute
  • Cherokee Nation History Course at UCLA
    Saturday-Sunday, November 5-6, 2016 & Saturday-Sunday, November 19-20, 2016, 9 AM - 6 PM, Haines Hall A25
    Join Cherokee Nation citizens in the Los Angeles area, students, and others in exploring a complex and fascinating tribal history. This course has been awarded by Harvard's "Honoring Nations" program for tribal initiatives that support the understanding and expansion of tribal sovereignty. Covering legal, governmental, social, and cultural aspects of the history, the Cherokee Nation History Course is a well-rounded view of this story as understood by Cherokees themselves.
    Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Beyond the Elections: Political Impacts on Communities of Color
    Thursday, October 27, 2016, 5:30-8PM, 144 Haines Hall
    What can we learn from this election season and how can we use this knowledge to advance racial and political equity? Featuring a panel of UCLA scholars and researchers, this critical discussion will address local, state, and national discourse and referenda and their impact on communities of color. In addition to candidates for elected office, several propositions will be on the November ballot that may significantly affect underprivileged populations, including the poor, immigrant, and those imprisoned for non-violent crimes.
    Sponsored by the UCLA Institute of American Cultures; Organized by the Asian American Studies Center, the American Indian Studies Center, the Bunche Center for African American Studies, and the Chicano Studies Research Center
  • Solidarity with the Indigenous Peoples of Mexico in Resistance
    Monday, October 24, 2016, Conference Room 2 & 3, Student Activties Center
    A special presentation by Comandanta Nestora Salgado, ex-political prisoner and authority of the Regional Coordinator of Community Authorities Police-Community (CRAC-PC) of Guerrero.
    Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, and UCLA Latin American Institute
  • 31st Annual California Indian Conference
    Thursday-Saturday, October 20-22, 2016, San Diego State University
    This conference brings together California Indians, educators, tribal scholars, academics, students, public agencies, organizations and institutions, and the general public.
    Co-sponsored by California State University Office of the Chancellor, SDSU President's Leadership Fund, UCLA American Indian Studies Center, Procopio, Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation, SDSU Sycuan Institute on Tribal Gaming, SDSU Department of American Indian Studies, Rincon Band of Luiseño Indians, University of San Diego—Office of the Tribal Liaison, SDSU College of Arts and Letters, SDSU College of Education, Barona Band of Mission Indians, SDSU Native American Scholars and Collaborators Project, San Pasqual Band of Mission Indians, Native American Student Development, UC Berkeley, SDSU Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2016 World Indigenous Law Conference: Rights, Responsibilities, and Resilience: An International Discourse on Indigenous Peoples' Jurisprudence
    Wednesday-Saturday, October 19-22, 2016, The Beckman Center of the National Academies of Sciences & Engineering
    The World Indigenous Law Conference is held every two years and will be hosted in October 2016 in North America for the first time. This Conference is an international forum aimed at gathering Indigenous lawyers, practitioners, academics and those interested in furthering their understanding of issues facing Indigenous Peoples. Key elements of this conference include an international discourse on Indigenous Peoples' Jurisprudence: examining legal frameworks and strategies for self-determined futures.
    Co-sponsor: UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • UCLA American Indian Welcome
    Monday, October 3, 2016, 5:00–7:00PM, UCLA Pauley Pavilion Clubhouse
    Students, alumni, community members, faculty, and staff are invited to the 2016 welcome celebration for the American Indian community at UCLA
    Co-sponsor: UCLA American Indian Studies Center, American Indian Student Association, UCLA American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program, and Diversity Programs, UCLA Alumni Affairs
  • Sundaes on Tuesdays
    Tuesday, August 16, 2016, 11:30AM–1:30PM, UCLA LGBT Campus Resource Center, B36 SAC
    LGBT Center's second annual sundaes on Tuesdays
    Co-sponsor: UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • 6th Annual L.A. Skins Music Fest
    Saturday, July 23, 2016, 5–9PM, The Frog Spot, 2825 Benedict Street Los Angeles, CA 90039
    A Native American concert series that celebrates contemporary Native American musicians. (Free admission)
    Co-sponsor: UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • American Indian Graduation Celebration
    Friday, June 10, 2016, 4:30 – 7pm, De Neve Plaza View Room
    End of the year celebration for the graduates (graduate, undergraduate, and professional) of the American Indian Studies at UCLA.
    Host: UCLA American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program, UCLA American Indian Student Association
    Co-sponsored by UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • 5th Annual American Indian Research Symposium
    Wednesday, June 8, 2016, 10am – 3pm, UCLA School of Law, Room 2248
    Join the Interdepartmental Program as they celebrate the research of the graduating class of 2016 – Master Theses, Undergraduate Major Capstones and other student research/internships.
    Host: UCLA American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program
    Co-sponsored by UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Give a Name and Face to Political Prisoners Campaign 2016
    Friday, June 3, 2016, 3 – 5pm, Chicano Studies Research Center Library 144 Haines Hall
    This event is based on communities in resistance and criminalization. Presented by Nestora Salgado, Atziri Avila, Gloria Munez, Laura Carlsen, Gasper Rivera-Salgado
    Co-sponsored by UCLA American Indian Studies Center and UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center
  • Racialized State Violence in Global Perspective
    Wednesday – Thursday, May 25 – 26, 2016, Royce 306 & 314 and Harry and Yvonne Lenart Auditorium of the Fowler Museum
    This conference brings together scholars who work on racialized police violence in North America with others who work in Brazil, Central America, the UK, the Caribbean, and elsewhere to consider the questions of pressing global importance including economic inequality, state power, racism and indigeneity.
    Host: UCLA Center for the Study of Women
    Co-sponsored by UCLA American Indian Studies Center, Alessandro Duranti, David Schaberg, UCLA Center for the Study of Women, Institute on Inequality and Democracy at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, Robin D.G. Kelley, Eric Avila, UCLA African Studies Center, Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA, UCLA Department of Gender Studies, Disability Studies at UCLA, UCLA International Institute, and UCLA Postcolonial Theory and Literary Studies
  • Resolving Conflict & Loss: an Indigenous Path
    Thursday, May 12, 2016, 1:15 – 2:30pm, United Nations FF Building, Room 1528
    Presenters examined the situations of indigenous persons living in New Zealand, Samoa, and Ukrainian Crimea to demonstrate why and how structural forms of violence historically remained the core cause of interstate and international conflicts. Presented by Valmaine Toki, Lydia Moira Faitalia, Ulia Popova (Gosart)
    Co-sponsored by UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • Contemporary Indigenous and Native American Cultures in North and Central America
    Thursday, May 12, 2016, 9 - 12 PM, 6275 Bunche Hall
    A symposium on Contemporary Indigenous and Native American Cultures in North and Central America.
    Co-sponsored by UCLA American Indian Studies Center, American Indian Studies Interdepartmental Program, Center for Mexican Studies, Institut d'ethnologie Méditerranéenne Européenne et Comparative,
  • The 31st Annual UCLA Pow Wow
    Saturday-Sunday, May 7-8, 2016, UCLA North Athletic Field
    The 31st annual pow wow, organized and presented by the UCLA American Indian Student Association, featuring traditional Native American singing and dancing, the Miss UCLA Pow Wow Pageant.
    Co-sponsored by UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • El Penacho de Moctezuma
    May 6, 2016, 2 - 4 PM, Royce Hall 314
    Documentary screening of "El Penacho de Moctezuma" with a Q&A with Dr. María Olvido Moreno Guzmán to follow.
    Co-sponsored by UCLA Getty, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, Center for Mexican Studies, UCLA American Indian Studies Center, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center
  • Contemporary Mexican Featherwork: An Ancient Tradition
    May 4, 2016, 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM, 6275 Bunche Hall
    Dr. María Olvido Moreno Guzmán, Coordinator of "Project Prehispanic Mural Painting in Mexico," Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, UNAM, Mexico, discusses the history and evolution of Mexican featherwork.
    Co-sponsored by UCLA Getty, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, Center for Mexican Studies, UCLA American Indian Studies Center, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center
  • A Student Luncheon and Discussion with Dr. Tarajean Yazzie-Mintz
    April 26, 12-1 PM, 3343 Public Affairs
    A meet & greet with Dr. Tarajean Yazzie-Mintz, Senior Program Officer, American Indian College Fund
    Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center
  • La Costumbre del Maíz con los Nahuas de Chicontepec, Veracruz
    April 20, 3-5 PM, 144 Haines Hall
    Presentation and lecture on the ceremonial planting of maize by Professor Eduardo De La Cruz. Eduardo De La Cruz is the Assistant Director of Instituto de Docencia e Investigación de Zacatecas (INDIEZ).
  • Simposio sobre académicos Indígenas
    April 19, 4-5:30 PM, Rolfe Hall 4302
    Dos Académicos Indígenas conversando sobre sus experiencias y metas en la enseñanza de Idiomas Indígenas a la Academia y Comunidad.
    Hosted by: UCLA Latin American Institute
    Co-sponsored by: Department of Spanish and Portuguese, UCLA American Indian Studies Center, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center
  • Urgent Issues Forum/Foro Urgente: The Assassination of Berta Cáceres and the Future of Indigenous and Afrodescendant Environmental and Land Rights in Honduras
    Friday, April 8, 2016, 9 AM - 2 PM, Presentation Room, Charles E. Young Research Library
    This urgent forum explores the issues of resource extraction and state violence and their impact on the future of indigenous and environmental rights activism in Honduras.
    Hosted by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center. Co-sponsored by the UCLA Institute of American Cultures, UCLA Asian American Studies Center, UCLA Chicano Research Studies Center, UCLA Center of Study for Women, UCLA Latin American Institute, and Grassroots International.
  • Fantasizing and Reframing the (Un)Human: Lived Settler Logics and Literary Sites of Disruptive Relationality
    Wednesday, April 6, 2016, 4-6 PM, 2125 Rolfe Hall.
    Lecture by Dr. Rene Dietrich, seeked to investigate the lived settler logics of "humanness" and to ask how literary strategies of relationality in contemporary Native writing work to disrupt them.
  • Trying Times: Disability, Activism and Education in Samoa
    Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 3-5 PM, 2343 Public Affairs
    Lecture by Dr. Juliann Anesi.
    Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, REPAIR AND NetCE.
  • Biopolitics, Aging and the Struggle for Indigenous Elsewhere
    Thursday, February 18, 2016, 2-4 PM, Cypress Room, UCLA Faculty Center
    Lecture by Professor Sandy Grande.
    Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, REPAIR AND NetCE.
  • The Next Frontier in Federal Indian Law: Building on the Foundational Work of Carole E. Goldberg, UCLA School of Law
    Friday, February 5, 2016, UCLA Law School
    This year's Symposium will focus on cutting edge issues in federal Indian law and, in so doing, celebrate the 40+ year career of Jonathon D. Varat Professor of Law Carole E. Goldberg. Federal Indian law, broadly defined, governs the relationship between the federal government and the more than 566 Indian nations within the United States, as well as implicating states' rights and raising questions that bear on tribal law and issues of self-determination.
    Hosted by the UCLA Law Review
    Co-sponsored by the UCLA American Indian Studies Center and UCLA Critical Race Studies

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